Meghan Markle labels November vote the most important of our lifetime


Prince Harry and Meghan Markle faced a backlash today for speaking out about the upcoming U.S. election despite the British royal family’s strict political neutrality.  

The Duke of Sussex told voters to ‘reject hate speech, misinformation and online negativity’ while the Duchess called the presidential race the ‘most important election of our lifetime’ as the couple urged Americans to use their right to vote.  

Speaking in a Time 100 video message, apparently filmed from the couple’s California home, Harry admitted he was not eligible to vote in the November 3 election – adding that he had never voted in the UK either where convention dictates that royals should keep well clear of politics.  

But while Harry and Meghan did not endorse a candidate, their intervention sparked criticism from viewers who said it was none of their business. 

‘Why’s a UK prince and his wife getting involved in a U.S. election? What business is it of his? Didn’t we fight a war to end interference from the British Monarchy?,’ asked one. 

Another said it was ‘obvious’ that the royal couple were supporting Joe Biden, given Meghan’s criticisms of Donald Trump before she became a royal – saying their intervention was ‘unacceptable for royal family members’. 

‘Why would a prince of the realm of the UK encourage U.S. citizens to vote in a U.S. election? How can this be allowed?,’ asked another.     

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle have spoken out about the upcoming U.S. election, in a stark break with British tradition that prohibits royal involvement in politics

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle have spoken out about the upcoming U.S. election, in a stark break with British tradition that prohibits royal involvement in politics

For his part, Harry said: 'As we approach this November, it's vital that we reject hate speech, misinformation and online negativity'

For his part, Harry said: ‘As we approach this November, it’s vital that we reject hate speech, misinformation and online negativity’

‘Every four years we are told the same thing, that this is the most important election of our lifetime. But this one is,’ said Markle, 39, in the video clip broadcast as part of the Time 100, the magazine’s annual list of the world’s 100 most influential people.

Harry and Meghan were included in the 2018 list, but not in this year’s edition.  

Markle continued: ‘When we vote, our values are put into action and our voices are heard. Your voice is a reminder that you matter, because you do and you deserve to be heard.’ 

For his part, Harry said: ‘As we approach this November, it’s vital that we reject hate speech, misinformation and online negativity.’ 

Harry urged Americans to be careful about what kind of content they consume online.

‘When the bad outweighs the good, for many, whether we realize it or not, it erodes our ability to have compassion and our ability to put ourself in someone else’s shoes. Because when one person buys into negativity online, the effects are felt exponentially. It’s time to not only reflect, but act,’ he said. 

Harry also referenced the fact that, because he is not a U.S. citizen, he will not be able to vote in November. 

He added that he had never been able to vote in the UK, despite being theoretically eligible in the last five general elections since he turned 18. 

Although British law does not explicitly forbid members of the royal family from voting, the expectation that royals remain apolitical is considered sacrosanct, and in practice they never participate in elections, by voting or otherwise.  

But since announcing plans to step down as senior royals in January and moving to North America, Meghan and Harry have quietly expanded their involvement in politics as they forge their own path.

Trump

Biden

Markle has made her position on the 2020 election clear in a number of appearances in recent weeks, expressing enthusiasm for the Democratic ticket

How British royals are expected to keep out of politics  

Under Britain’s constitutional monarchy, powers which theoretically belong to the Queen – such as appointing ministers and approving legislation – are exercised in her name by political leaders. 

This system means that political decisions are taken by the elected government rather than unelected royals, while keeping the monarchy as a symbol of the British state and its traditions. 

The royals’ political neutrality, which the Queen has scrupulously observed for 68 years, is key to maintaining this balance and to preserving the monarchy’s popularity. 

King Edward VIII had to abdicate in 1936 because the government refused to support his planned marriage to American divorcee Wallis Simpson – fatally compromising his neutrality.   

While there is no explicit law preventing the Queen or her family from voting in elections, doing so would be an unacceptable breach of protocol.   

The Queen holds weekly conversations with her prime ministers and she is entitled to ‘advise and warn’ them when necessary, but the nature of her advice is never made public.  

Prince Charles is also known for writing a series of letters to ministers on policy subjects, some of which were made public in 2015.  

This week, feminist activist Gloria Steinem revealed that Markle had joined her in cold-calling…



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