“If you don’t push the lever for the Democrats, you are assisting Trump”


Noam Chomsky
Noam Chomsky

US linguist and political activist Noam Chomsky EULER ANDREY/AFP via Getty Images

Noam Chomsky, one of the world’s foremost public intellectuals, has provided the international left with wisdom, guidance and inspiration for nearly 60 years. Proving that he operates at the locus where argumentation and activism meet, he demonstrates indispensable intellectual leadership on issues of foreign policy, democratic socialism and rejection of corporate media bromides.

One of the founders of linguistics, he is also an American dissident who has wrestled with systems of power on matters no less important than genocide, war and poverty, creating a corpus of classics, ranging from his manifesto against the Vietnam War, “American Power and the New Mandarins,” to his amplification of reason against a jingoistic cacophony following the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, “9-11.” “Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of the Mass Media,” which he co-authored with Edward S. Herman, is essential reading for anyone interested in the real biases against democracy in the commercial press. His more recent book “What Kind of Creatures Are We?” provides a deft and provocative exploration of human purpose and the common good.

At 91, he is still committed to seeking and sharing the truth, and showing little patience for the foolishness and selfishness of the powerful. 

With dozens of books, and countless lectures and articles, Chomsky has addressed nearly every major topic of politics and economics with an orientation toward democracy, peace, and justice, but his new book is possibly his most urgent. “Climate Crisis and the Global Green New Deal,” co-authored with progressive economist Robert Pollin, measures the stakes of climate change as threatening the survival of the human species, and offers a bold and ambitious solution that can not only stave off disaster, but create a more beautiful, hospitable and just world.

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I recently interviewed Chomsky over the phone about climate change, the Green New Deal, and the 2020 presidential election. 

We can, perhaps, begin by spotlighting Amy Coney Barrett’s remarks at her nomination hearings calling climate change a “controversial and contentious issue.” One of the realities you and your co-author, Robert Pollin, identify in this book, which seems to elude most other analysts, is that while our mainstream discourse often presents a “debate” surrounding climate change, there is no debate at all – not just among scientists, but among the institutions that are actively making the problem worse. They know they are courting catastrophe.

Not just “courting,” but causing catastrophe. She not only said that it is “contentious.” She said, “I’m not a scientist. I don’t really know about it.” Unless she is a hermit living in Montana without any contact with the outside world, it is inconceivable that anyone could even be considered for a Supreme Court position who doesn’t know about the most significant environmental issue.

In the case of the major institutions, let’s start with the Pentagon. They are open about it. They acknowledge that climate change is a serious threat. They’ve argued we should prepare for it. They’ve published documents about it. Certainly, they know about it.

In the case of ExxonMobil, their scientists were among the first to discover the nature of the problem back in the 1970s. We have the full record, and it’s quite extensive. Their scientists provided detailed reports on the threat of global warming – on the threat it will have on the business of fossil fuels. They knew and know about everything. What actually happened with ExxonMobil is – when James Hansen made a speech about global warming in 1988, which received a lot of publicity, at that point management moved to a new position. It wasn’t outright detail, because that would have been too easy to expose. They said, “Well, it’s uncertain.” This was a strategy to shed doubt. In other words, “we really don’t know yet. So, we better not do anything precipitous.” That was an effective strategy, and that’s the Barret strategy: “It’s contentious.” Meanwhile, the scientific evidence is accumulating beyond any question. ExxonMobil knows all of this, and they’ve said straight out that, unlike other companies, they won’t put aside funds to develop sustainable energy. They’ve committed to keeping to their business model of doing what is most profitable, and that is developing as many fossil fuels as possible. 

Then, there is JPMorgan Chase. They know, and they’ve conceded. They were one of the world’s leading financiers of fossil fuels. Recently, their CEO, Jamie Dimon, announced [they] have to do something about fossil fuels, because of the reputational risks. “Reputational risks” translates into “it is harming our business, because consumers are upset.” In fact, an interesting memo leaked from JPMorgan Chase that said [the company is] pursuing policies that…



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